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Course Catalog

BASIC VISION SCIENCE COURSES

BVS 106: Microscopic Anatomy

3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab/demonstration per week

The fundamental tissue types of the body will be discussed at the microscopic (cellular and subcellular) level. The location of these tissue types in the eye will be discussed, where applicable. Various organ systems formed by these tissues will then be discussed in detail. In the laboratories, students will review the tissues and organs discussed in lecture using computer images. Clinical applications will be presented throughout the course, where applicable. (4 credits)

 

BVS 107: Applied Ocular Anatomy

5 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week 

This course presents a detailed study of the human eye, adnexa and reviews the anatomy of the orbit and its contents. The clinical relevance of the anatomy is supported by clinical examples (i.e. discussion of clinical cases, ocular disease conditions) throughout the course. The course includes an overview of the eyeball, ocular circulation, a review of the orbit, paranasal sinuses and nerves innervating the eyeball and adnexa, study of the extraocular muscles and the ocular adnexa. A detailed study of all layers of the eyeball, visual pathways, pupil pathways and a review of ocular embryology is also included. Laboratory sessions are designed to reinforce the anatomical relationships presented in lecture visually in three dimensions. Labs include the use of human skulls, orbits, eyeball models, ophthalmotropes, photographs of ocular structures, histology slides of monkey eyes and slit lamps.(6 credits)

BVS 111 : Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology

3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This course develops an appreciation for the basic principles of structure, function, and organization of the human nervous system. Topics include organization of the central nervous system, cerebral spinal fluid and meninges, histology of neurons and glia, neural development, degeneration and regeneration, and basic principles of neurophysiology such as ionic mechanisms of resting membrane and action potentials as well as synaptic transmission. This course also presents functional neuroanatomy. Structure and function of sensory systems and motor systems are included. Analyses of the visual system are emphasized. Case histories of representative neurological disorders are also presented. Laboratory examines the internal anatomy of the brain and brain stem. (4 credits)

BVS 113: Gross Anatomy

3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This course will introduce the student to the fundamental structure of the body at the gross anatomical level using a clinical anatomy approach where the concepts of bodily structure and function as they relate to the diagnosis and treatment of patients are emphasized. Basic anatomical concepts will be introduced along with a review of systems. The anatomy of the head, neck, including essential concepts of neuroanatomy, and trunk will be covered. In the laboratories, students will build upon and integrate the anatomical concepts introduced in lecture using computer images, models, textbooks, and online sources. (4 credits)

 

BVS 116.1: Human Physiology and Pathology I

4 hours of lecture per week

This 4 credit hour course is a comprehensive course in general and systemic human physiology and pathology taught at the level of a health care professions graduate student.. Topics are presented in order to promote the understanding of physiologic principles that form the basis for normal bodily functions. The eye is not the focus of this course but ocular health will be discussed when applicable. The interaction between organ systems and their relationship to health and disease are also presented. This integration of normal physiology and pathologic processes will form the knowledge base for further study of pharmacology, clinical medicine and ocular disease. (4 credits)

 

BVS 116.2: Human Physiology and Pathology II

2 hours of lecture per week

This course is a comprehensive course in general and systemic human physiology and pathology taught at the level of a health care professions graduate student. Topics are presented in order to promote both the understanding of physiologic principles that form the basis for normal bodily functions as well as the pathologies that befall them. The eye is not the focus of this course but ocular health will be discussed when applicable. This course is the second in the BVS 116 sequence. (2 credits)

 

BVS 116.3: Human Physiology and Pathology III

4 hours of lecture per week

This course is a comprehensive course in general and systemic human physiology and pathology as well as immunology taught at the level of a health care professions graduate student. Topics are presented in order to promote both the understanding of physiologic principles that form the basis for normal bodily functions as well as the pathologies that befall them. The eye is not the focus of this course but ocular health will be discussed when applicable. This course is the third in the BVS 116 sequence. (4 credits)

 

BVS 120.1: Geometric and Theoretical Optics I

4 hours of lecture per week and five 70-minute workshops per quarter

This course is the first in a series of two courses in Geometric and Theoretical Optics. Students develop a basic understanding of vergence, refraction, reflection and the corresponding object-image relationships. The underlying optics for refraction at plane and curved surfaces (e.g., prisms, thin lenses, single refracting surfaces, and systems of single refracting surfaces) and reflection at plane and curved surfaces will be covered in detail. Recitation sessions and workshops will be held prior to examinations. This course requires an elementary knowledge base of algebra, trigonometry, and a judgmental mathematical background. Individuals with weak backgrounds in these areas are strongly recommended to review deficient areas. (4.5 credits)

 

BVS 120.2: Geometric and Theoretical Optics II

3 hours of lecture per week

This course is the second in a series of two courses in Geometric and Theoretical Optics and will focus on the study of optical systems with multiple refracting surfaces and on magnification. The underlying optics for thin lenses, thick lenses, hand-held and fixed-focus magnifiers, and telescopes will be covered in detail. The clinical corollaries will be stressed. Recitation sessions will be held prior to examinations. Like the first course in this series, this course requires an elementary knowledge base of algebra, trigonometry, and a judgmental mathematical background. (3 credits)

 

BVS 140.1: Vision Science I

4 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This course is the first in a series of courses in vision science that explore how humans perceive their visual world. In this course, students will be introduced to the practical application of the physics of light and the techniques of visual psychophysics. Following an understanding of this basic material, students will be ready to explore how the retina controls our ability to light and dark adapt as well as detect contrast. We will explore how the physiology and neural connections of the retina determine some of our basic perceptions. The clinical relevance of these topics will be stressed such as infant/toddler vision testing, lighting applications, automated perimetry, wavefront technology, and more. (5 credits)

 

BVS 150.1: Biochemistry I

4 hours of lecture per week

An introduction to biochemistry with particular emphasis on clinical applications. Topics

in the first course in this two-course sequence may include nutrition, cellular biology, and biochemistry of tears, conjunctiva, and cornea with special emphasis on the structure and functions of proteins and enzymes as well as metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Case studies and journal articles will be used to demonstrate the useful applications of these principles to health-related issues. (4 credits)

 

BVS 150.2: Biochemistry II

4 hours of lecture per week

Topics in the second course in this two-course sequence may include molecular biology, and more metabolism with a special emphasis aqueous production, the lens, vitreous, and retina. Additionally, we will discuss the biochemical importance of the liver and other specialized tissue. Case studies will be used to demonstrate the useful applications of these principles to health-related issues. (4 credits)

 

BVS 171: Visual and Physical Optics

3 hours of lecture per week

This course explores the optics of the human visual system. Building from the solid foundation developed in Geometrical and Theoretical Optics, this course will “stretch” those key concepts to demonstrate their application to clinical optometry. You will gain an understanding of refractive error and correction, as well as the benefits and limitations of the human eye as an optical system. Emphasizing concepts from both wave theory and particle theory, this course will also address the optics behind diffraction, interference, polarization, absorption, and the impact of electromagnetic radiation on the eye. (3 credits)

 

BVS 240.2: Vision Science II

4 hours of lecture and 1 hour of lab per week

In this course, we extend our investigation into how the structures beyond the retina contribute to our visual perceptions. We will focus initially on our ability to resolve fine detail and the two factors that potentially limit our acuity; optical quality of the eye and

the density of foveal cones. We will determine how the quality of the eye’s optics are evaluated using traditional methods along with newer methods involving wavefront technology. We will then explore how the eye and brain work together to perceive not just fine detail, but objects and scenes in everyday life. We will discuss the ability of the visual system to not only perceive motion, but to determine whether the source of motion is from self-movement or from an object in motion. An understanding of how objects and scenes are visually perceived will involve an investigation into the role of the primary visual cortex (V1) as well as the neural structures beyond. We will also investigate many classes of visual illusions since an understanding of how visual perceptions go awry not only illuminates aspects of normal visual processing but vividly demonstrates how our visual perceptions are educated guesses about what is “out there” in our visual field. (4.5 credits)

 

BVS 240.3: Vision Science III

3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of lab per week

This course is the last in the series of vision science that presents topics related to the physiological and psychological basis of color vision, binocularity and space perception that illustrate clinically related issues pertaining to the use of two eyes. Specific contents include color mixing, color properties and theory/ neuroanatomy responsible for color vision perception, cues to depth perception, the horopter, stereopsis, fusion, rivalry and aniseikonia. Relevant clinical assessments will be discussed in lectures and demonstrated in laboratory sessions. (3.5 credits)

 

BVS 244: Ocular Motility

2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of lab per week

This course examines the anatomy, physiology, and function of the ocular motor system. Neurology of eye movements is also presented including the pathophysiology of neuro-ophthalmic disorders. The biophysics and kinematics of all functional classes of human eye movements are discussed, both normal and abnormal clinical characteristics, including etiology, signs, symptoms, differential diagnosis, and management strategies. Laboratory sessions present evidence-based clinical techniques for testing ocular motility and include student presentations of innovative techniques, clinical devices, and unique case studies. (2.5 credits)

 

BVS 245: Developmental Vision and Neurobiology

1 hour of lecture per week

This course discusses the development of vision and visual neuropathway such as the changing structures and functions as the organism matures in the first half. Emphasis is placed on the role of normal and abnormal environmental factors for the development of the visual pathway. (1 credit)

BVS 254.1: General and Ocular Pharmacology I

4 hours of lecture per week

This is the first course in a three quarter sequence devoted to General and Ocular Pharmacology and Therapeutics. In this course we will present the principles and practice of the science of pharmacology. Quantitative and qualitative aspects of basic pharmacodynamics and drug/patient related variables will be discussed. In addition application to ocular environment and conditions will be included. General topics include diabetic and other endocrine agents, local and general anesthetic agents, gastrointestinal agents, autonomic nervous system agents, and anti-hypertensive agents. More selective topics include dyes, preservatives, ocular anesthetics, and ocular autonomic agents. (4 credits)

BVS 254.2: General and Ocular Pharmacology II

4 hours of lecture per week

You are now familiar with how drugs work, how they get where they need to be, and how they are finally eliminated from the body. We have given you the groundwork for all that is to come over winter quarter. In this second quarter of pharmacology we will discuss the pharmacology and toxicology of the individual agents in the remaining major drug class. Topics include;

anti-coagulants, anti-hyperlipidemics, central nervous system agents, allergy, anti-bacterial agents, and antiviral agents. Ocular topics will be sequences with the anterior segment course and include dry eye, allergy, anti-viral agents, anti-bacterial agents, and antifungal/protozoal agents. (4 credits)

 

BVS 256: General and Ocular Pharmacology III

4 hours of lecture per week

You are now familiar with how drugs work, how they get where they need to be, and how they are finally eliminated from the body. Winter quarter also introduced you to the major drugs used in the treatment and management of a majority anterior segment disease along with their adverse reactions and contraindications.

 

This quarter, in alignment/continuation of your anterior segment and your glaucoma course, you’ll be introduced to anti-inflammatory drugs and drugs used to treat glaucoma. We’ll also discuss drugs used in the diagnosis and management of neuro-optometric conditions and drugs used in the treatment of posterior segment disease, mainly retina drugs. We will wrap up the quarter by reviewing adverse systemic reactions caused by ocular agents and adverse ocular reactions caused by systemic agents, followed by sources of drug information, new drug development, drug regulations and prescription writing to finish all the course material. Like the previous quarter, when applicable, you’ll be given lectures that provide information on more general and systemic topics of pharmacology before focusing on the eye. (4 credits)

BVS 266: Microbiology

1.5 hours of lecture per week

Microbiology is designed to provide a basic introduction to pathogenic microbiology. The course reviews the major pathogens of human disease, the processes by which these pathogens grow, reproduce, and cause disease, and how these pathogens are identified. Viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic pathogens are discussed. In addition, the impact of infectious disease on public health is also discussed with emphasis on current trends and resources. (1.5 credit)

BVS 390: Evidence Based Health Care

2 hours of lecture per week

This course will enhance the students’ ability to interpret and critique the medical literature to help develop an evidenced-based approach toward clinical care. It will also provide foundational principles of public health. Some of the topics that will be covered include an introduction to epidemiologic methods, study design, statistical reporting commonly used in clinical reports, and issues surrounding research involving human subjects. A few contemporary topics relevant to public health will be discussed such as better understanding the social and behavioral factors related to health. (2 credits)

 

BVS 403: Student Research Project

Independent Study

This activity is designed to provide an exercise in professional-level clinical case study, literature review, and research. The student will learn the basics of researching a topic, analyzing the information gained, and writing a summary of the conclusions. All optometrists need to be able to analyze concepts presented, review the literature, and determine for themselves what they consider best for their patients. By developing these skills, the optometrist is in a better position to remain current in their knowledge throughout their career. (3 credits)

OCULAR DISEASE COURSES

OCD 213: Ocular Pathophysiology

3 hours of lecture

This course will cover the general processes of ocular physiology; the functions, properties, and activities of the human eye as it relates to ocular disease. This course will also delve into basic clinical considerations and pave the way for more complex disease diagnosis and management later in the ocular disease sequence. The basic science and clinical application of diagnostic testing will be introduced. (3 credits)

 

OCD 260.1: Anterior Segment I

3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

Students will study the multidimensional aspects of ocular disease, such as the anatomical, histological, pathological, and physiological basis of disease processes, as well as review pharmacology and proper course of treatment plans. In the anterior segment track, lectures are presented on commonly encountered disorders and diseases of the anterior segment. These topics will include disorders of the lids, dry eye, ocular allergy, viral conjunctivitis, herpetic ocular disease, fungal and protozoal infections, bacterial conjunctivitis, bacterial infections, ocular allergic disease, lacrimal disorders, disorders of the orbit, and thyroid eye disease. Emphasis will include identification, diagnosis, and treatment of these anomalies. Laboratory sessions will consist of hands on assessment and treatment techniques for these common anterior segment anomalies, as well as interactive case discussions. (4 credits)

 

OCD 260.2: Anterior Segment II

3 hours of lecture and 1 hour of lab per week

Anterior Segment Disease II continues the ocular disease sequence for diseases related to the anterior segment including diseases of the cornea, uveal tract, and lens. Specific topics to be discussed will include corneal degenerations, corneal dystrophies, corneal ectasia, anterior uveitis, systemic underlying causes of anterior uveitis, episcleritis, scleritis, and immunologic diseases. Major emphasis will include clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of these anomalies. The underlying mechanism and pathophysiology of conditions will be discussed. Independent learning is required for this course. OCD 260.2 includes a hands-on lab and case discussion opportunities to enhance clinical learning. Online learning opportunities will also serve to reinforce key information and topics. (3.5 credits)

 

OCD 262.1: Glaucoma/Neuro-Eye I

2 hours of lecture per week and 1 hour of lab per week

Students will study the multidimensional aspects of ocular disease, such as the anatomical, histological, pathological, and physiological basis of disease processes. This track combines glaucoma and neuro-related eye diseases, presented in an alternating, and sometimes integrated, fashion. Initially, the basics of primary open angle glaucoma are presented, including the pathophysiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and initial treatment aspects of the primary open angle glaucoma spectrum. In addition, the topics of automated perimetry and optical coherence tomography for glaucoma are included. Later in the sequence, glaucoma will be revisited emphasizing treatment and management concepts for a more advanced approach to patients with open angle glaucoma, as well as introduce primary angle closure, secondary and developmental forms of glaucoma. The neuro-eye disease portion of the track will cover common and compelling neuro-ophthalmic disorders encountered in practice, including: neuro-imaging, pupillary disorders, neurologic visual field defects, optic neuropathies, cranial neuropathies, cranial nerve testing, myasthenia gravis, thyroid eye disease, brainstem ocular motility disorders, nystagmus, cerebrovascular disease, migraine, and concussion. (2.5 credits)

 

OCD 360.1: Clinical Medicine

2 hours of lecture per week

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of the more prevalent systemic disorders and their clinical presentations. Nomenclature, pathophysiology, and basic clinical signs and symptoms will be presented along with current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Special attention will be given to the counseling and education of those patients choosing to discuss or solicit advice from the optometric primary care provider. (2 credits)

 

OCD 360.2: Clinical Medicine II

2 hours of lecture per week

This course is the second in the OCD 360 sequence. (2 credits)

 

OCD 362.1: Glaucoma/Neuro-Eye II

2 hour of lecture per week and 1 hour of lab per week

Continuation of Glaucoma/Neuro-Eye I. (2.5 credits)

 

OCD 362.2: Glaucoma/Neuro-Eye III

2 hour of lecture per week and 1 hour of lab per week

Continuation of Glaucoma/Neuro-Eye II. (2.5 credits)

 

OCD 367.1: Retina I

2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of lab per week

This course in the ocular disease sequence is the first of two courses to present ocular disease related to the retina and vitreous.

Retina I is a comprehensive overview of the common (and some less common) disorders affecting the posterior segment of the eye that may present in clinical practice. The topics include ophthalmic ultrasonography, optical coherence tomography, ocular fluorescein angiography, diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive disease, venous occlusive disease, arterial occlusive disease, age-related macular degeneration, polypoidal choroidal vasculopathy, vitreoretinal disorders, peripheral retinal diseases, developmental vitreoretinal disorders and retinal conditions associated with congenital optic nerve disorders. Pathophysiology of these topics will be covered. The clinical presentation, evaluation, and the management of these conditions will be emphasized. (2.5 credits)

 

OCD 367.2: Retina II

2 hours of lecture and 1 hour of lab per week

This is the second course in the ocular disease sequence that presents ocular pathology related to the retina and vitreous.

Retina II is a comprehensive overview of the common (and some less common) disorders affecting the posterior segment of the eye that may present in clinical practice. The topics include a review of all topics covered in Retina I plus acquired macular diseases, electrodiagnostic testing, hereditary retinal disorders, peripheral proliferative retinopathies, retinal degenerations, the phakomatoses, posterior segment inflammatory diseases and ocular oncology. Pathophysiology of these topics will be covered. The clinical presentation, evaluation, and the management of these conditions will be emphasized. (2.5 credits)

 

OCD 370: Ophthalmic Lasers and Surgical Procedures

2.5 hours of lecture and 1 hour of lab per week

The injections portion of this course is a comprehensive overview of injection procedures for optometric practice, including injectable medications, side effects, management of complications, and patient education. Additionally, OSHA guidelines are highlighted, as well as the necessary instruments and supplies needed to perform injectable procedures. The associated laboratory consists of video presentations that demonstrate basic skills for injections as well as individual injection techniques. Covered procedures will include intravenous, subcutaneous, intramuscular, intradermal, subconjunctival, and intralesional injections.

The minor surgical procedures portion is a comprehensive overview of surgical procedures for optometric practice, including introduction to surgical instruments, structure, function, and care of common periocular skin lesions, local anesthesia, chalazion management, radiofrequency surgery, incision making, biopsy, post-operative wound care, and suturing. An associated lab will give participants hands-on experience with minor surgical procedures.

 

Refractive and medical lasers are an important consideration in the practice and referral patterns of the primary care optometrist. Optometrists who perform and/or co-manage laser procedures can play a critical role in ensuring successful surgical outcomes by: assessing patient candidacy, facilitating the pre-operative examination, providing patient education, recommending specific procedures, and providing post-operative care. In certain states with laser privileges, optometrists may also be the ones performing the laser surgical procedures. The laser portion of this course will review basic laser physics and safety, laser-ocular tissue interactions, and medicolegal considerations in laser surgical procedures. Refractive surgery procedures that are commonly co-managed by optometry will be presented, with special attention to those procedures approved for performance by certified optometric surgeons in select states. The course will also review co-management procedures for refractive surgery such as pre-operative testing, candidacy, indications/contraindications, management of complications and post-operative care. This course will also focus on medical lasers used in anterior segment procedures such as argon laser trabeculoplasty, selective laser trabeculoplasty, posterior capsulotomy, and peripheral iridotomy. Since gonioscopy skills are vital to the performance of some of these procedures, it will be reviewed along with interpretation and documentation of angle structures. There will also be laboratory time devoted to hands-on use of all the medical lasers, including performance of simulated procedures on model eyes. (3 credits)

 

OCD 371: Ocular Disease Seminar

1.5 hours of lecture per week

This course is designed to present cases in a peer-oriented, team environment to thoroughly dissect various types of commonly encountered clinical cases, involving red eye/painful eye, diplopia, and loss of vision from the initial presentation to diagnosis and treatment. This capstone course will enable the student to increase confidence and competence in a discussion-based class with group and instructor feedback. This course has been modelled after the Harvard Medical School team-based learning. This involves open discussion between peers and instructors to understand how diseases present clinically, what tests will help aid in proper diagnoses, and how to manage ocular diseases. Evidence based medicine will be utilized to facilitate discussion. (1.5 credits)

PATIENT CARE EDUCATION COURSES

PCE 190.1 – Clinical Assistant Program (Primary Eyecare) I

4 hours of patient care per week for half quarter

The Clinical Assistant Program (CAP) provides first professional year students with their initial opportunity to interact with patients, student clinicians and faculty members in the Primary Eye Care Service of the Illinois Eye Institute (IEI). CAP students assist third and fourth year student clinicians throughout a patient encounter by recording data, escorting patients within the IEI for special testing and scheduling appointments. A significant focus of this program is incorporating performance of technical skills up to a real-time level of preclinical training under the direct supervision of a student clinician with more clinical experience. Objectives of this program include gaining familiarity with IEI and its various departments, gaining proficiency with the EHR system, beginning to perform clinical skills on IEI patients, developing effective communication with both patients and attending doctors, increasing professional responsibilities and ultimately preparing the student for direct patient care experiences during the second professional year. (1 credit)

 

PCE 190.2 – Clinical Assistant Program (Primary Eyecare) II

4 hours of patient care per week for half quarter

Continuation of PCE 190.1. (1 credit)

 

PCE 281.1 – Patient Care Program (Primary Eyecare) I

4 hours of patient care per week

This clinical program provides second professional year students with the opportunity for primary care encounters throughout their second professional year. The students are able to utilize their skills and clinical thinking on par with the extent of their didactic and laboratory education. With the guidance of their attending faculty, they gradually work more independently to examine patients in Illinois Eye Institute's Primary Eye Care Service. (2 credits)

 

PCE 281.2 – Patient Care Program (Primary Eyecare) II

4 hours of patient care per week

Continuation of PCE 281.1. (2 credits)

 

PCE 281.3 -Patient Care Program (Primary Eyecare) III

4 hours of patient care per week for half quarter

Continuation of PCE 281.2. (1 credit)

 

PCE 283.1 – Eyewear Center I

4 hours of patient care per week for half quarter

This course is designed to bridge the learning experiences from the Ophthalmic Optics Laboratory to the clinical experiences in the Eyewear Center with supervision. Instruction is focused on the practical skills of frame, lenses, and coatings selection; frame repair and adjustments; lensometry; and troubleshooting for asthenopic patients. Emphasis is placed on improving the accuracy of pupillary distance, segment height, base curve and boxing system measurements. Students hone their patient education skills by explaining eyeglasses options; giving dispensing instructions; and clarifying insurance benefits. (1 credit)

 

PCE 283.2 – Eyewear Center II

4 hours of patient care per week for half quarter

Continuation of PCE 283.1. (1 credit)

 

PCE 375 – Specialty Rotation (Vision Rehabilitation)

4 hours of patient care per week for half quarter

This rotation provides students with clinical and patient management skills needed to provide comprehensive eye care for persons with visual impairments. The Low Vision Rehabilitation Services encompasses care for those whose loss of functional vision has impaired their ability to use vision for a variety of daily living and working skills. Student clinicians learn how to provide services that focus on maximizing patients’ use of their remaining vision for the purpose of enhancing overall quality of life. Management may include low vision optical devices, accessory devices, adaptive technology, specialized training and referral to appropriate agencies/services. The Vision Rehabilitation Service provides an ideal setting to further refine the students’ knowledge in ocular pathology. Student clinicians additionally gain some experience with making appropriate referrals for psychosocial counseling, orientation and mobility training, vocational rehabilitation, special educators, ancillary medical services, and benefits casework. (2 credits)

 

PCE 376 – Specialty Rotation (Cornea / Contact Lens)

4 hours of patient care per week

This course initiates the development of contact lens and corneal pathology clinical techniques and skills following the optometry curriculum. The diagnosis and management of refractive, functional, and ocular disease will be emphasized. Students will be expected through direct care to successfully fit and evaluate soft spherical, toric, and multifocal contact lenses, and corneal gas permeable contact lenses. Students will also be expected to demonstrate working knowledge of these contact lens options. Discussion time and clinical observation will focus on entry to practice topics with additional advanced topics including specialty contact lenses, corneal irregularity, ocular surface disease, and myopia management when time permits. (2 credits)

 

PCE 377 – Specialty Rotation (Pediatrics / Binocular Vision)

4 hours of patient care per week for half quarter

This clinic rotation introduces third year clinicians to the diagnosis and management of pediatric and binocular vision patients. Students will gain exposure through observations and direct care with examination of infants, toddlers, preschoolers, patients with developmental disabilities, visual information processing function, strabismus/amblyopia, and binocular vision efficiency. It also includes observation of vision therapy for binocular problems, strabismus/amblyopia, visual information processing deficiencies, and visual development enhancement. (2 credits)

 

PCE 378 – Specialty Rotation (Glaucoma Unit)

4 hours of patient care per week for half quarter

This clinical course provides third year students with the opportunity to participate in patient care in the Glaucoma Unit. This will further enhance their clinical education with a more uniform and consistent experience diagnosing and managing primary and secondary glaucomas, as well as glaucoma suspects, and patients with ocular hypertension. (2 credits)

 

PCE 380 – Patient Care Program (Primary Eyecare)

1 hour lecture and 4 hours of patient care per week

This series of courses continue the development of primary eye care clinical techniques and skills in a practical clinical setting. Students are enrolled throughout the entire third year. The diagnosis and management of related eye disorders, including refractive, functional and ocular disease within a patient care setting will be emphasized. Primary care conference and clinical case discussions will help to incorporate advanced diagnostic and therapeutic clinical techniques and topics into the student clinician’s experience. This experience is designed to enable students to refine their diagnostic, therapeutic and communication skills, through interaction with a diverse patient population. (3 credits)

 

PCE 380.1 – Patient Care Program (Primary Eyecare)

1 hour lecture and 8 hours of patient care per week

Continuation of PCE 380. (5 credits)

 

PCE 380.2 – Patient Care Program (Primary Eyecare)

1 hour lecture and 8 hours of patient care per week

Continuation of PCE 380.1. (5 credits)

 

PCE 380.3 – Patient Care Program (Primary Eyecare)

1 hour lecture and 8 hours of patient care per week

Continuation of PCE 380.2. (5 credits)

 

PCE 383 – Eyewear Center

4 hours of patient care per week

Continuation of PCE 283.2. (2 credits)

 

PCE 481 – IEI Patient Care Rotation

2 hours of lecture and 36 hours of patient care per week

The fourth year patient care sequence builds upon the previous primary and specialty eye care experiences by incorporating advanced diagnostic and therapeutic techniques. Students obtain experience in all aspects of optometric care, including advanced ophthalmic care, cornea and contact lenses, low vision rehabilitation, pediatric optometry and binocular vision, primary care, urgent care, and telehealth during externship rotations at the Illinois Eye Institute. This rotation includes weekly conferences to supplement the patient care experience. (20 credits)

 

PCE 485 – VA/Hospital-Based Externship Rotation

40 hours of patient care per week

All fourth year students are required to spend one quarter in a Veterans Administration Medical Center / Outpatient Center or in a Hospital Based setting primarily dedicated to the delivery of both primary eyecare and ocular disease services. Students attend weekly grand rounds conferences provided by residents and attending doctors to supplement their patient care experience. (20 credits)

PCE 491 – Specialty Externship Rotation

40 hours of patient care per week

All fourth year students are required to spend one quarter off campus in a location primarily dedicated to providing comprehensive primary eye care services, including

basic contact lens fittings. They will be exposed to the workings of running an office, including staffing, marketing and billing and coding issues. (20 credits)

 

PCE 492 – Specialty Externship Rotation

40 hours of patient care per week

All fourth year students are required to spend one quarter in a location primarily dedicated to the delivery of specialty optometric services such as complex contact lenses, pediatrics and binocular vision, low vision rehabilitation or ocular disease. (20 credits)

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT COURSES​

PME 100: Practice Management I

20 hours of lecture per year

This course will prepare students for optometric practice management. Students will develop an understanding of professional ethics and practice verbal and non-verbal communication skills. The course will analyze barriers to equity in health care and challenge students to become culturally competent. Students will hone their networking and interviewing skills hands-on. They will explore money management, billing and coding, licensing, credentialing, and insurance. (2 credits)

 

PME 200: Practice Management II

10 hours of lecture per year

Continuation of PME 100. (1 credit)

PME 300: Practice Management III

15 hours of lecture per year

Continuation of PME 200. (1.5 credits)

 

PME 391: Business of Optometry

2 hours of lecture per week

This course is designed to expand your knowledge of the business side of Optometry. Practice management topics are presented throughout your education at ICO in various classes, seminars and symposiums. This class will include Practice Management experts as well as ICO faculty members who will present information that will help you create a strategy for your professional future. The course will guide you to develop ‘business care’ that will compliment your ‘patient care’ skills. Class projects are required to optimize the time scheduled for this class. (2 credits)

PRIMARY OPTOMETRIC PRACTICE COURSES

POP 162.1: Clinical Methods and Procedures I

2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This three credit hour course introduces the first year optometry student to the comprehensive eye examination, specifically those introductory skills necessary to serve as a clinical assistant in patient care, including automated testing. Proficiency will be developed in visual acuity measurement, entrance testing, and lensometry. The student will also develop data analysis and interpretation skills. This course also introduces the student to the concepts of database and problem-related testing. In this regard, the course emphasizes identification of appropriate entrance testing to screen for disorders of refraction, functional vision and ocular health. This is the first of a five-course sequence that prepares students for their initial patient care experiences within the Illinois Eye Institute. The course sequence is cumulative, and each course in the series presumes a grasp of the topics and skills presented in the previous courses. The concepts presented here form a foundation for each student’s clinical education, as well as his/her future career in optometry. (3 credits)

 

POP 162.2: Clinical Methods and Procedures II

2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This three credit hour course builds upon the clinical skills acquired during the first quarter of the first professional year. Clinical Methods and Procedures II continues to focus attention on the acquisition of new technical skills by introducing the fundamental clinical techniques that are part of a refraction sequence. Lecture topics include: case history interview, ophthalmometry (keratometry), static streak retinoscopy, manifest refraction (short subjective/monocular subjective refraction), ocular dominance and binocular balance (accommodation balance), duochrome balance (red-green, bichrome balance), and refraction analysis. At the end of this course, a student will be able to complete a thorough case history interview, analyze refractive data, perform a refractive sequence on a patient and formulate a spectacle correction suggestion. (3 credits)

 

POP 162.4: Clinical Methods and Procedures III

3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

Clinical Methods and Procedures III is the third course in a series of five courses during the first two years of the professional program. This course builds upon the clinical skills acquired during the first two quarters of the first professional year and is designed to prepare the student for initial clinical interactions within the Illinois Eye Institute. Clinical Methods and Procedures III introduces fundamental clinical techniques that are part of a near visual system analysis. Lecture topics include assessment of the binocular visual system and the accommodative system. The course continues to focus attention on the acquisition of new technical skills but also emphasizes the integration of these skills into an examination sequence. The normative values for database tests will be presented as well as the indications for pursuing problem-related testing. Assessment and diagnosis will be reviewed and a brief introduction into treatment modalities. (4 credits)

 

POP 262.1: Clinical Methods and Procedures IV

2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This is the fourth course in the Clinical Methods and Procedures sequence. The primary purpose of the sequence is to prepare students for entry level patient care in primary care at the Illinois Eye Institute. This course introduces the second year optometry student to the requisite clinical techniques needed to complete the ocular health portion of a comprehensive eye examination. Skills introduced include direct ophthalmoscopy, slit lamp biomicroscopy, tonometry, binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy, biomicroscopic indirect ophthalmoscopy and gonioscopy. (3 credits)

 

POP 262.2: Clinical Methods and Procedures Seminar

1 hour of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This is the fifth and final course in the Clinical Methods and Procedures sequence. This course is designed to introduce new clinical skills, review and enhance existing clinical skills, and improve clinical thinking through case analysis. New skills include enhanced binocular indirect ophthalmoscopy techniques, 4-mirror gonioscopy, and undilated indirect biomicroscopy. Emphasis will be placed on full synthesis of the clinical techniques presented throughout the Clinical Methods and Procedures sequence to provide final preparation for entering third year clinical rotations in the Illinois Eye Institute. Clinical case analysis will include diagnosis and management of ametropia, binocular vision disorders, accommodative disorders, anterior and posterior segment disease covered in the curriculum to date. Test selection and assessment and plan writing will be reviewed. This course is cumulative, and knowledge learned throughout the Clinical Methods and Procedures sequence is necessary. The laboratory portion of this course will provide an opportunity for the student to review, synthesize and expand on knowledge and skills with faculty supervision and feedback. The laboratory culminates with a comprehensive assessment of skills learned throughout the entire five course sequence. (2 credits)

 

POP 270.1: Ophthalmic Optics I

4 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This course is the first of two that studies the optics and clinical use of ophthalmic equipment including spectacles, contact lenses, and examination equipment. Students will explore spectacle frame types, measurements, selection, alignment, modification, and repair. Lens types will be introduced with an emphasis on materials and designs. The laboratory is designed as a practical setting for the application of techniques in lens selection, frame selection and the delivery of these materials to a clinical patient with an emphasis on the ophthalmic materials meeting the patient’s visual needs. (5 credits)

 

POP 270.2: Ophthalmic Optics II

3 hours of lecture per week

This course is the second of two in the studies the optics and clinical use of ophthalmic equipment including spectacles, contact lenses, and examination instruments. Students will explore characteristics of ophthalmic lenses including curvature, thickness, prism, and lens design. The design of spectacles for high prescriptions and anisometropia will be discussed. The course concludes with the optics of ophthalmic instruments. (3 credits)

SPECIALTY OPTOMETRIC PRACTICE COURSES

SOP 266.1: Contact Lenses I

3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

About 122 million people worldwide use contact lenses as their primary means of vision correction. This course will teach you how to prescribe the most commonly used types of contact lenses. Entry-level information will be provided via lecture, laboratory venues, and through independent learning. The goal of the course is to make the student familiar with the prescription and management of soft and rigid contact lenses for the correction of myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism, presbyopia, and therapeutics. Practice management techniques related to contact lenses care will be included in this patient- oriented course. (4 credits)

 

SOP 267: Vision Rehabilitation

2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This is an entry level course, which provides the fundamental knowledge of clinical low vision rehabilitation (LVR) care necessary to perform LVR during clinical rotations, and in practice after graduation. This course will cover extended history taking, assessment of psychological and cognitive status, trial frame refraction, visual function assessment, functional field assessment, determination of magnification, glare control, contrast enhancement and assistive technology. In addition, awareness of the rehabilitation network including rehabilitation services, referrals and development of Individual Rehabilitation Plans will be included. LVR specific to different ocular diseases and dystrophies will be covered. (3 credits)

 

SOP 366.2: Contact Lenses II

3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

The second course in contact lenses emphasizes the application of specialty lens modalities. This course reviews indications, care andhandling, approaches to fitting and evaluation and availability of designs and parameters in specialty lenses. Subject matter includes applications for myopia control, high ametropia, and irregular corneas. Designs discussed include specialty soft contact lenses, corneal, limbal and scleral GP contact lens designs, and hybrid lenses. The weekly laboratory will provide a combination of webinars, case discussions, and hands-on fittings of a variety of lens designs, allowing students the opportunity to review proper handling and evaluation techniques unique to specialty lenses..Students will be assigned to groups to experience both diagnostic and empirical fitting of specialty lenses. (4 credits)

 

SOP 375: Binocular Vision Disorders

2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This course covers treatment strategies and patient management for non-strabismic binocular disorders. A problem-oriented approach is used to present treatment procedures for oculomotor, accommodative, sensory, and vergence problems. Students will learn how lenses, prisms, and vision therapy are used to alleviate symptoms in patients with these conditions. The lab covers common vision therapy techniques for the treatment of these visual efficiency disorders. (3 credits)

 

SOP 376.1: Strabismus and Amblyopia I

3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This course emphasizes the detection, measurement, classification, and etiology of strabismus and amblyopia. An organized approach to a comprehensive evaluation is presented and includes the assessment of associated anomalies such as eccentric fixation, suppression, anomalous correspondence, and noncomitancy. The lab portion of the course is designed to familiarize students with testing procedures and includes diagnostic examination of simulated patients manifesting such conditions. (4 credits)

 

SOP 376.2: Strabismus and Amblyopia II

3 hours of lecture per week

This course presents theoretical and clinical considerations in the management of common forms of strabismus and amblyopia including the rationale and methods for using lenses, prisms, occlusion, vision therapy, medication, and surgery. Students will learn specific strategies for the treatment of strabismus, amblyopia, and associated anomalies including eccentric fixation and anomalous correspondence. Students will also analyze individual patients’ cases, particularly their therapeutic programs. (3 credits)

 

SOP 379: Infant/Child Development and Management

2 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week

This course emphasizes the examination, diagnosis and management of infants, children, and individuals with special needs. This population is at risk for developing ocular, visual, and/or visual perceptual abnormalities that may adversely affect the individual’s learning or quality of life. Emphasis will also be placed on visual information processing assessment strategies, including proper administration and interpretation of standardized tests. (3 credits)